Help to reduce, reuse and recycle

Chloe FraserSound Telegraph
Mother Theresa Catholic College Year 6 students Kendall Forbes, Luke Tammen and Nicholas Lucas.
Camera IconMother Theresa Catholic College Year 6 students Kendall Forbes, Luke Tammen and Nicholas Lucas. Credit: Chloe Fraser

Mother Teresa Catholic College and Honeywood Primary School are among 25 Water Wise accredited schools which will receive a share in $67,000 to implement projects that reduce waste disposed to landfill.

The funding was announced last week, coinciding with National Recycling Week.

Honeywood Primary School in Wandi will receive a $2182 boost to help set up worm farms and compost systems to reduce food waste to landfill.

Baldivis’ Mother Teresa Catholic College has received two grants. The college’s junior school will spend its $4964 worth of funding by purchasing worm farms, compost bins and garden infrastructure.

Its middle school was also successful in its grant application, receiving $4379 to set up worm farms, compost bins, garden beds and a recycling station.

Mother Theresa Catholic College Year 6 students show off the schools worm farm.
Camera IconMother Theresa Catholic College Year 6 students show off the schools worm farm. Credit: Chloe Fraser

The funding comes after the McGowan Government earlier this month announced the release of new “monster inspired” WasteSorted signage for WA schools to help students correctly sort their waste.

The Waste Wise School accreditation program delivers educational resources aimed at changing behaviour to avoid the generation of waste and encourage diverting waste from landfill.

Accredited Waste Wise schools encourage students to “avoid, reduce, reuse and recycle” by providing students and the community with practical activities that raise awareness and reduce waste.

Mother Theresa Catholic College Year 6 students at work in the school's garden.
Camera IconMother Theresa Catholic College Year 6 students at work in the school's garden. Credit: Chloe Fraser

Environment Minister Stephen Dawson said students at Waste Wise Schools showed an “impressive commitment” to changing their behaviour to avoid waste and minimise the amount that ends up in landfill.

“We need to follow this example being set by our kids,” he said. “We all have a responsibility to do the right thing and adopt smarter ways to manage our waste at home, at work and at school.”

Applications are open for the next Waste Wise Schools grants funding round, closing on December 3. For more information on the program or to become accredited visit the Waste Authority website.

Get the latest news from thewest.com.au in your inbox.

Sign up for our emails