Author helps break cycle of DV

Chloe FraserSound Telegraph
Rockingham’s Liz Atherton is hoping to help victims of domestic violence with her new book Get Out Get Free.
Camera IconRockingham’s Liz Atherton is hoping to help victims of domestic violence with her new book Get Out Get Free. Credit: Chloe Fraser

After experiencing and overcoming a toxic and abusive relationship, Rockingham’s Liz Atherton is hoping to help victims of domestic violence identify and escape abusive relationships and navigate the daunting police and court systems which follow.

In her book Get Out Get Free, Atherton draws on her own experiences to help victims identify abuse, set boundaries for their safety and deal with overwhelming stress and emotions. Moving forward from abusive relationships during her childhood and adult relationships, Atherton said she was inspired to write a book to help others in their journey to healing and happiness.

The book covers distinctive patterns and behaviours involved in toxic relationships.

“When you go through an abusive relationship you have got so many stresses going on that it can be hard to think straight,” she said.

“Stresses from ongoing threats, about the safety of yourself and your children, promises of a better future and wanting to reduce your extreme stress can make breaking free difficult, but knowing what to do when stress is reigning and you feel numb, is challenging.

“This book is about setting boundaries, working through fears, and discovering the options and resources available to help you escape and heal from your abuse.”

While some charities and services can provide the book to victims for free, a protected online version of the book can be purchased for $4.99 and is accompanied with a small survey to help provide victims with personalised assistance.

All proceeds of the book and further programs go to Conscious Care Community Ltd, Atherton’s new not-for-profit organisation which links victims to community support, education and services.

“I know I went through what I did so that I can help others. . . I think if we have enough voices out there speaking up we can bring significant change,” she said.

Conscious Care Community aims to develop a central community hub of services providers, agencies and departments to give people the capability to find the help they need at a local level and feel embedded in the community.

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