Curious minds set to be invigorated this month as The Museum of the Great Southern hosts events for National Science Week

Kellie BalaamAlbany Advertiser
Museum of the Great Southern regional manager Catherine Salmaggi with part of the Astrofest exhibition.
Camera IconMuseum of the Great Southern regional manager Catherine Salmaggi with part of the Astrofest exhibition. Credit: Laurie Benson/Albany Advertiser, Laurie Benson

The Museum of the Great Southern will host a range of events to stimulate curious minds throughout August as National Science Week brings together a celebration of all things science and technology.

Partnering with the Great Southern Science Council, the museum will be involved in more than 20 events including free activities for children and the popular Astrofest as the annual science week kicks off from August 15.

“With COVID-19 being present we wanted to put together a program with a variety of subject matters that the locals can take advantage of,” Museum of the Great Southern regional manager Catherine Salmaggi said.

“The Museum is looking forward to National Science Week as this is the first year Astrofest has come to Albany.”

Vernice Gillies.
Camera IconVernice Gillies. Credit: Laurie Benson

Menang Elder Vernice Gillies and Noongar woman Kathleen Toonath will speak about the technologies of the Oyster Harbour fish traps on an on-country tour.

Attendees can enjoy a tranquil morning experience on the harbour foreshore exploring the rich culture of ancient times. The $10 tour will take place from 10am to 12.30pm on August 14.

Other events include a panel discussion about fresh water in the Great Southern; an early years STEM program looking at planning, designing and building towns; and a screening of the film Breathing Life into Boodja presented by Gondwana Link’s Keith Bradbury.

The Great Southern Science Council will also host the Great Southern Great Science Symposium, a one-day showcase of science.

The symposium will run from 9.30am to 3pm on August 14 at Albany Entertainment Centre.

At the symposium, UWA Professor Malcolm McCulloch will give an address about discoveries made at the Bremer Canyon during the recent voyage of the RV Falkor.

There will also be an opportunity to tour the marine machines from the Bremer Canyon expedition, including the RV Falkor and its remotely operated vehicle SuBastian.

Paolo Montagna & Dr Julie Trotter with RV Falkor.
Camera IconPaolo Montagna & Dr Julie Trotter with RV Falkor. Credit: Michael Traill

UWA’s Alison Lullfitz will speak about new research on Noongar food plants, Curtin University duo Chris Kirkland and Milo Barham will delve into the geological past of the Great Southern, and WA soil scientist Tim Overheu will explore regenerative agriculture.

Morning tea and lunch will be provided at the symposium followed by a sundowner and networking event at Due South.

Two days earlier, on August 12, the Mt Barker Community Resource Centre Science Fair will cover a range of science topics through interactive projects.

Aimed at children from the age of seven, the free fair runs tomorrow and again next Wednesday, August 12.

Part of the Astrofest exhibition.
Camera IconPart of the Astrofest exhibition. Credit: Laurie Benson/Albany Advertiser

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